THUNDERING HOOVES RANCH

Brianna Dudleston

The first time I saw horses was on my grandmother’s farm in Cheyenne Wyoming.  I was three years old and I fell in love!  I started riding the ponies she had at the age of five.   At the age of eleven I began taking lessons in a small class of six where I advanced to a teaching position.   My love for horses just kept growing.  In an effort to further my knowledge I began looking for additional training. 

I met Richard Shrake at the Utah Horse Expo in 2000 where he was conducting demonstrations and talking about his Resistance Free Training methods. After talking to him for a while, I signed up for his program to become a certified Instructor.  I continued taking and assisting at Richards Clinics in Oregon for the following four years after which I conducted my own clinic in Bountiful with Richard in attendance for my final certification.

During this time I taught lessons for all ages and trained multiple horses including my own. Sienna was my first horse and accompanied me at all training clinics.  Needless to say, she is my most trained mare. I can ride her with just a lead rope and she will do whatever I ask of her. Later on to test my skills I bought a two year old filly with problems such as biting, striking, kicking, shying away etc.  This mare was broke without any bucking and is now a fairly well behaved horse.  She is touchable all over, lifts her feet for you and lets you hug her head.  I can walk behind her with no worries of her kicking.  Also in my career with horses  I became an Intern Vet Assistant for Buffalo Ranch and later became a payed employee there and did all kinds of things like, treat colic, train babies, artificially inseminate, embryo transfers, transfer herds of 50+ horses between pasture, etc. Was an experience of my life and I may further continue my knowledge and go to school to  become a vet.  

I realized at a young age that I have a knack for this and I absolutely love teaching the skills I have to others. I enjoy watching a rider and horse become ‘one’ working as a unit, thinking alike and moving together.